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Mauritian Gastronomy

mauritian gastronomy

Following the colonisation of Mauritius by the French in 1715, the mainstream gastronomy of the settlers was French, but slaves from Madagascar and Africa and workers from southern India consumed their own traditional staple foods, however some cross-cultural cuisine was beginning to emerge.

When Pierre Poivre was appointed Administrator of the island in 1767, he introduced cloves and nutmeg plants as well as other spices in a bid to break the Dutch monopoly on the spice trade. Most of these spices are still grown here today and are widely used. One particular type of Saffron is very popular here. It is made from the root of the plant and dried and ground to a fine powder. It is also known as Turmeric or Curcuma.

British ColonisationFollowing the colonisation of Mauritius by the French in 1715, the mainstream gastronomy of the settlers was French, but slaves from Madagascar and Africa and workers from southern India consumed their own traditional staple foods, however some cross-cultural cuisine was beginning to emerge.

British ColonisationMauritian cuisine is traditionally eclectic thanks its diverse history and population, but now Mauritian chefs, who have achieved international recognition, have created a "new" cuisine of Mauritius based on a fusion of styles that incorporate more international dimensions. They have adopted a fresh and adventurous approach to using exotic spices and local or imported produce. International chefs based in Mauritius, many of whom are Michelin starred, are mainly employed in luxury hotels, are also pushing the boundaries and are using imported fresh or chilled produce to create dishes outside of the norm for Mauritius. Now, gastronomes may find kangaroo, crocodile or ostrich meat from Australia, mussels from New Zealand, smoked salmon from Scotland, lobsters and crabs from Brittany combines with local delicacies like smoked marlin, fresh fish farmed in the lagoons, or locally produced duck foie gras.

British ColonisationYou dare not eat it because you suffer from high blood pressure, diabetes, cholesterol or simply because you are on a diet? Then look no further because one Mauritian chef has created an exciting new chapatti that takes care of all these fears.

British ColonisationMauritius is a paradise for the senses, not only for the eyes with its beautiful landscape, but also for the palate. Gastronomes will find a variety of flavours and aromas inherited from the different migrations through its history.