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Golf

Playing golf Mauritius

Mauritius is home to one of the oldest golf courses in the Southern Hemisphere, and the fourth oldest course in the world, the Gymkhana golf course, located in Vacoas in the central region of the island and created in 1902. However golf has only really grown in popularity in Mauritius since the opening of the first golf course for tourists at Le Paradis Beachcomber Golf Resort and Spa in Le Morne in the mid-1990s. This 18-hole course often claims to be one of the most beautiful with its spectacular backdrop of magnificent mountains and fairways that line the shoreline of the stunning bay.

The Mauritian climate and topography make it especially suited to golf, as the fertility of the soil and the tropical climate increase the speed at which new golf developments can mature and be ready for play and their rapid rate of recovery following extreme weather.

Since the creation of the first tourist golf course, many others followed as the price of sugar tumbled and more land became available for re-development, with many resort owners investing in their own courses as the tourism sector grew. Today Mauritius is home to a number of golf courses that attracts professional and amateur golfers for golfing holidays from far and wide.

golf mauritiusThe rise in popularity of golf and the proliferation of golf courses has coincided with the general growth in tourism in Mauritius and its positioning as a major pillar of the Mauritian economy. Most of the golf courses on the island are attached to major hotel groups, but there are also private member golf courses, including the oldest golf course in the Southern Hemisphere, and the fourth oldest course in the world, the 18-hole Gymkhana golf course, located in Vacoas in the central region of the island and created in 1902, and the Dodo Club, a 9-hole course located in Curepipe, also in the central region.

Golf resort facing beautiful sea of MauritiusThere was no indigenous golf on the island, but when sugar prices recently tumbled land became available for redevelopment, and many resort owners decided to create their own courses as the tourism sector grew. Though borrowing more from the ideology of the sport's roots than any physical attributes it may share with the Home of Golf in Scotland, visitors, particularly from Europe, will be reassured that they will enjoy traditional, strategic challenges, free from the contrivances of 'signature' golf courses prevalent in the rest of the world.